PDF Race, Nation, and West Indian Immigration to Honduras, 1890-1940

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Be the first to write a review About this product. About this product Product Information At the turn of the twentieth century, Honduras witnessed the expansion of its banana industry and the development of the United Fruit Company and Standard Fruit into multinational corporations with significant political and economic influence in Latin America and the Caribbean.

These companies relied heavily on an imported labor force, thousands of West Indian workers, whose arrival in Honduras immediately sparked anti-black and anti-immigrant sentiment throughout the country. Glenn A.

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Chambers examines the West Indian immigrant community in Honduras through the development of the country's fruit industry, revealing that West Indians fought to maintain their identities as workers, Protestants, blacks, and English speakers in the midst of popular Latin American nationalistic notions of mestizaje, or mixed-race identity.

West Indians lived as outsiders in Honduran society owing to the many racially motivated initiatives of the Honduran government that defined acceptable immigration as "white only. This conflict ultimately led to animosity between English-speaking and Spanish-speaking Hondurans, as well as between West Indians and non--West Indian peoples of African descent. An all-inclusive Afro-Honduran identity never emerged in Honduras, Chambers reveals.


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  • These companies relied heavily on an imported labor force, thousands of West Indian workers, whose arrival in Honduras immediately sparked anti-black and anti-immigrant sentiment throughout the country. Glenn A. Chambers examines the West Indian immigrant community in Honduras through the development of the country's fruit industry, revealing that West Indians fought to maintain their identities as workers, Protestants, blacks, and English speakers in the midst of popular Latin American nationalistic notions of mestizaje, or mixed-race identity.

    Moreover, just as they "disassociated themselves from the black masses in their home countries prior to immigration" p.

    Among its many threads are labor, migration, community and identity formation, nationalism, transnationalism, diasporas, colonialism and imperialism, mestizaje , blackness, and gender. Unfortunately, the author does not fully tease out these themes, even though doing so would have deepened and advanced his analysis.

    For example, despite the prominence of "nation" in the title, direct engagement with the concept is limited to a brief quotation from Benedict Anderson's Imagined Communities Transnationalism also emerges as an important trope, yet the author does not engage [End Page ] at all with Project MUSE promotes the creation and dissemination of essential humanities and social science resources through collaboration with libraries, publishers, and scholars worldwide.

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