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Safe Passages

For this reason, the health and welfare of the animals deserves the most attention on high traffic roads. See the examples below to learn more about what we do to improve wildlife habitat connectivity around the state. We monitor some culverts and bridges to understand how animals use these structures. Wildlife structures, such as jumpouts and wildlife guards, are monitored to determine their effectiveness. View this video to see the variety of animals using these structures. We use fences to keep large animals off the highways. Studies show they reduce collisions between vehicles and large animals mainly elk, deer, and moose by 80 to 99 percent.

Gaps in fencing at intersecting side roads and on- and off-ramps are places where animals can gain access to the highway. Fences alone serve as barriers to important resources for the survival and successful procreation of animals. Combining fences with crossing structures either over or under the highway surface provide opportunities for animals to move past highways safely.

(PDF) Jon P. Beckman, Safe Passages | Bruno Saranholi - gistdersfape.cf

After replacing a bridge on U. Grading and planting produced a more natural looking setting.

The safe passage opportunity at Casey Ponds will improve as vegetative cover develops on the approaches to the bridge. As traffic volume goes up, a vehicle is more likely to hit and kill an animal trying to cross. The less wary are killed and the more wary learn to avoid the road. Eventually, avoidance becomes the main response to a busy road and animals on either side of the road become isolated from one another.

Safe Passages : Highways, Wildlife, and Habitat Connectivity.

For this reason, the health and welfare of the animals deserves the most attention on high traffic roads. See the examples below to learn more about what we do to improve wildlife habitat connectivity around the state. We monitor some culverts and bridges to understand how animals use these structures. Wildlife structures, such as jumpouts and wildlife guards, are monitored to determine their effectiveness.

View this video to see the variety of animals using these structures.

We use fences to keep large animals off the highways. Studies show they reduce collisions between vehicles and large animals mainly elk, deer, and moose by 80 to 99 percent. Gaps in fencing at intersecting side roads and on- and off-ramps are places where animals can gain access to the highway. Fences alone serve as barriers to important resources for the survival and successful procreation of animals.

Combining fences with crossing structures either over or under the highway surface provide opportunities for animals to move past highways safely. Why Connectivity Is Important A functional network of connected habitats is essential to the continued existence of California's diverse species and natural communities in the face of both human land use and climate change. How We Ensure Connectivity The California Department of Fish and Wildlife works closely with federal, tribal, state, and local agencies on three primary strategies to ensure habitat connectivity for wildlife.

Safe Passages: Highways Wildlife And Habitat Connectivity

Strategy Example Protect connectivity while habitat is still intact, through permanent conservation and adaptive management. Agencies use this statewide map and model to collectively build coarse-scale networks of conserved lands.

Wildlife crossing beaver dam

Avoid further fragmentation of habitat. Cluster urban development and site roads and other infrastructure projects where they are least likely to disrupt habitat connectivity. Conservation planning was integrated with regional transportation and land use planning to both preserve connected habitat and allow for appropriate development.